Maui

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Maui

Maui is the second largest island and sits in-between the smaller islands of Molokai, Lanai, Kahoolawe as well as the Big Island.  It is called the "Valley Isle" as a large, central valley formed in connecting the two different volcanic ranges that created the island.  One of these volcanic ranges is weathered and eroded into the beautiful wet and lush mountains of West Maui, leaving pockets of rainforest and riverbeds as well as matured, soft-rolling, white-sand beaches.  The other mountain range is Haleakala, the dormant (yet not dead) shield-volcano whose name means "House of the Sun" and whose body makes up a majority of the island (the East side).  Due to the rugged landscape, much of the East side is apart of the crater's national park, old ranching lands, jagged cliffsides, and untouched rainforest.  The diversity on this island is magnificent as one can be sun-tanning in the heated, south shore's resort beaches with a view of a snow-capped crater a mere few miles away.  Set in the middle of treacherous sea channels, Maui can be blustery windy, dry and sunny, frosty with hail, and pouring warm rain all in one day.  

Visit historic Lahaina, which was the old capitol of the Hawaiian Kingdom before attracting world wide sailors and becoming a whaling port town of which it still resembles.  Tee off the top-rated golf courses of the world, drink at the only pineapple winery in the state, swim in famous battlegrounds of Iao Valley stream, or watch the world famous windsurfing competitions at Hookipa.  Our guides can take the stress out of the long road to Hana, point out the waterfalls, taro farms, the lone churches and villages remaining from the 1800s, as well as the famous black sand beaches.  We will be sure to let you experience the "magic" of Maui in comfort.